University Lecture Series

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2304 Whitis Avenue
Austin, Texas – 78712
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University Lecture Series

University Lecture Series

Designed to create a campus-wide conversation, the University Lecture Series gives first-year students an opportunity to interact with leading members of our faculty—scholars, scientists, and civic leaders who are nationally and internationally renowned. All students, faculty, alumni, staff and community guests are invited, but the events will be aimed at entering first-year students. The series is funded by the Audre and Bernard Rapoport Excellence Fund for Undergraduate Studies.

View archived ULS events.

Spring 2019 Lecture Series

The Past, Present, and Future of the American Death Penalty
Prof. Jordan Steiker, School of Law
March 5 | 7-8 p.m. | Texas Union Theatre
This talk will focus on the past, present, and future of the American death penalty. Professor Steiker will focus on topics such as – the role of race in the American death penalty; the changing discourse in the American death penalty debate; the prospects for abolition in the U.S.; and more.

Sleeping Your Way to Academic Success
Dr. Patricia Carter, School of Nursing
April 2 | 7-8 p.m. | Texas Union Theatre
In this talk, Dr. Carter will discuss the science as it relates to what we know/suspect is true about sleep and roles that sleep plays in learning and memory.

The MasSpec Pen: Detecting Cancer by Touch
Dr. Livia Eberlin, Department of Chemistry
April 17 | 7-8 p.m. | Texas Union Theatre
Dr. Eberlin will describe her lab’s effort in developing the MasSpec Pen technology for cancer diagnosis and surgical margin evaluation. Focus will be given to their efforts designing the technology, including their exciting recent research testing the device in human surgeries.

Sustainability Showdown
April 22 | 7-8 p.m. | GEA 105
In the annual Sustainability Showdown, 8 professors from different undergraduate colleges will work in pairs to address the prompt: “How do your disciplines work together towards the Sustainable Development Goals?”

Concluded Spring Events

The Role of the Impostor Phenomenon in Ethnic Minority Student Achievement
Dr. Kevin Cokley, College of Liberal Arts
February 11 | 7-8 p.m. | Texas Union Theatre
Approximately 70% of all people experience feeling like an impostor. Ethnic minority students are especially prone to feeling like an impostor on predominantly white campuses. This lecture will define the impostor phenomenon and discuss its role in the academic outcomes and mental health of ethnic minority students.

Watch the lecture.

Featured Video

Hear from University Lecture Series participants about their valuable experiences with the program.