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STUDENT PROFILE

Priya Gupta

Priya Gupta headshot
Major:
Human Biology
Graduation Year:
Spring 2016
BDP Certificate:
Social Inequality, Health & Policy
My BDP allowed me to take classes and participate in research projects that went beyond the scope of my science major, while still focusing on healthcare.

Discuss your general career path since graduating from UT.

After I graduated UT in May 2016, I pursued my long-time dream of attending medical school. I am currently a second-year medical student at Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

How did your BDP experience influence your career path and interests?

My BDP in Social Inequality, Health & Policy allowed me to take classes and participate in research projects that went beyond the scope of my science major, while still focusing on healthcare. I was able to understand how healthcare works on a larger, national scale, especially the many policies involved in providing healthcare to all Americans. I was also able to explore the art of medicine.

What do you value most about your BDP experience?

I most value the opportunities I stumbled upon. Part of the BDP requirements are to complete either a research project or internship, so I got involved with drama and medicine, and later, helped write a systematic review. I would have never been able to do this if I had not been a part of BDP. This experience allowed me to see my passion for medicine in a completely different way, especially the artistic and humanistic basis of providing healthcare.

In what ways did an interdisciplinary education prepare you for what you are currently doing?

In medical school, my classmates and I are learning about what it means to be a humanistic doctor through courses such as Humanism in Medicine. We have the opportunity to practice these mannerisms (A.K.A. bedside manners) through our simulated and real-life patient encounters. Having an interdisciplinary education where I could present my own take on being a humanistic doctor is allowing me to approach my current medical education with the bigger picture in mind. When our pre-clinical coursework gets to be overwhelming, I can take a step back and visualize how I can use the information I am learning to be a better advocate for my patients and subsequently, a better physician.